Category Archives: Photo Appreciation

Tuscany

Tuscany by claudio naboni

Tuscany by claudio naboni

No landscape photo is complete without a main subject. Every photo needs a focal point to hold the viewer’s interest. In this case, it is a lone tree but it can be anything … for example, in my previous blog post, I have a canoe against a serene background.

The photographer also made use of 3 leading lines (the dividing line and the 2 slopes) to converge towards the main subject.

For large version of this photo, please go to PhotoExtract Photography Magazine.

The End Of The Waterfall

The End Of The Waterfall by Lillian Molstad Andresen

The End Of The Waterfall by Lillian Molstad Andresen

This is a unique composition for a waterfall. What’s so special?

Most of us will shoot the entire waterfall, from top to bottom. If it’s a really tall one, then we shoot in portrait (vertical) mode, just to include the whole thing into the frame. It’s our instinct and a no-brainer. Not that it’s wrong, of course.

This photographer, however, cleverly excluded the top portion of the waterfall so that its height is left to our imagination! The vertical drop can be as grand as you can imagine. I think it’s an awesome idea. But before I have my next chance to shoot a waterfall again, I shall browse through my old photos and see if I can crop them to simulate this effect.

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Camping during the eruption

Camping during the eruption by Marco Calandra

Camping during the eruption by Marco Calandra

What a classic outdoor photo! The red hot lava is a bonus for being in the right place at the right time! But it’s not so straight forward to capture this kind of image because you’re unlikely to get a sharply focused foreground object plus a starry night sky in a single shot.

You still follow the basics of night photography: tripod, cable-release (or, alternatively, use the 2-second self-timer), higher ISO, etc. But the key is to take two photos of the same composition. For the first photo, focus the lens to infinity and make an exposure for the sky. For the second photo, focus and do an exposure for the ground. Then merge both photos together using Photoshop. I’m not a huge fan of Photoshop manipulation, but in this case, I’ve to accept that it has to be done this way. I’ll try this technique next time (note that this is not my photo).

I do a lot of camping during summer and have experimented with different ways of shooting a tent glowing at night. To light the inside of a tent for this kind of shot, use either a candle or a Coleman lantern … and my tip is to remove its lid to avoid casting a shadow on top. Take out everything else inside the tent too, otherwise there will be distracting silhouettes. In addition, you may also need an external light source (for example, a nearby campfire or your vehicle’s headlights) to brighten up the area between yourself and the tent. And, finally, do not use flash.

For large version of this photo, please go to PhotoExtract Photography Magazine.

Snow Paradise

Snow Paradise by Vladan Laxa

Snow Paradise by Vladan Laxa

Snow scenes are beautiful, but it can be difficult to capture the pure-white look of freshly fallen snow. The #1 tip is to INCREASE the exposure so that you won’t end up with grey, dull snow! You just need to add a few extra stops till you get a more realistic looking white.

If this sounds too complicated, then simply use the Snow (or Beach or Beach/Snow) Mode of your camera! It may seem obvious, but this is an important reminder because many people tend get too excited and start shooting without switching to Snow Mode. I have been guilty of this before, but luckily it could be fixed in Lightroom.

For large version of this photo, please go to PhotoExtract Photography Magazine.

After the rain

After the rain by Martin Sprusansky

After the rain by Martin Sprusansky

We always read or hear about the Rule of Thirds and here is an obvious example! Such composition is usually pleasing to the eye. The lack of light or maybe the deliberate under-exposure adds to the mood. And remember, there is no bad or good weather for shooting photographs, as each weather has got its own beauty 😛

For large version of this photo, please go to PhotoExtract Photography Magazine.